Open Data slot

Open data: overview of policies and initiatives in SEE

Teaser

Open data in five countries from SEE.

Key words

Open data, re-use, Public Sector Information, Open licensing, PSI Directive, national legislations, national open data portals, European Data Portal, Open Data landscaping, Open Data Barometer

Session description

Brief overview of policies and initiatives in SEE on open data.

Session format

This slot will include a series of short presentations (4 minutes) from five countries. Each presentation will have to address briefly the following issues:

  • addresses of open data portals;
  • number of opened datasets;
  • two notable use cases (examples);
  • two lessons learned; and
  • opportunities for cooperation.
Main roles

Key participants:

  • Anelia Dimova, Ministry of Transport, Information Technologies and Communications, Bulgaria (video message)
  • Filip Manevski, Agency for Electronic Communications, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia
  • Slobodan Marković, Serbian National Internet Domain Registry, Serbia (online participation)
  • Matei-Eugen Vasile, Association for Technology and Internet, Romania

Moderator: Bogdan Manolea, Association for Technology and Internet, Romania

Online moderator: Fotjon Kosta, Ministry of Energy and Industry, Albania

Rapporteur: Andreea-Maria Tîrziu, National University of Political Studies and Public Administration, Romania

Session messages

  • It is necessary to involve non-state actors in the process of opening data, because they are intended users of open data and can provide experiences and new ideas on how to make open data beneficial to all its users.
  • Public institutions become more efficient, transparent, and accountable to citizens by using open data platforms. Moreover, they should assist citizens in understanding how they can make use of open data for their benefit.
  • Challenges and lessons learned from open data experiences include centralised architectures for open data portals, visible licensing for the use of published datasets, and unstandardised structure of related datasets.
  • Key elements of open data include free culture, Internet freedom, and the right to privacy.
  • Open data initiatives should be led by the people, especially by young entrepreneurs and students, not only by the government.
Resources

1. The 2017 Digital Economy and Society Index (DESI)

2. European Data portal 

3. Open Data Maturity in Europe 2016, Capgemini Consulting

4. Open data training, European Data Portal

5.  Open data barometer 

6. Bulgarian Open data portal 

Relevant proposals

24, 39 – See full list of proposals

Organising team
  • Bogdan Manolea, Association for Technology and Internet, Romania (focal point)
  • Anelia Dimova, Ministry of Transport, Information Technologies and Communications, Bulgaria
  • Slobodan Marković, Serbian National Internet Domain Registry, Serbia
  • Filip Manevski, Agency for Electronic Communications, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia

Contact points from SEEDIG’s executive committee: Sorina Teleanu

 

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